FAQs

FAQs beige tagsFAQs - questioning pooch

Listed below are Frequently Asked Questions Dr. Monica is often asked to respond to. Click on the question to view the answer.

1) What is an Animal Communicator?

2) How does someone carry on a conversation with an animal?

3) Can you explain a little more about telepathy?

4) But how does a person “tune in?” And what do you do with what you see or hear?

5) If you can “read” animals, can you also “read” people?

6) How did you first know that you could communicate telepathically?

7) What kind of animals do you communicate with?

8) What do you do when you talk with an animal?

9) What do animals want to talk about?

10) What are some of the more common problems you discuss with cats and dogs?

11) Can you help pets with other kinds of behavioral problems, especially if the pets have been abused?

12) Can you convince an animal to stop a certain behavior?

13) What can you do to help pets who are sick?

14) Can animals tell you about the pain they feel, or how they got hurt?

15) How are you able to acquire this information from an animal?

16) Do you work with pets who are dying?

17) Do animals know when they’re dying, or why we sometimes need to put them down?

18) Why do I sometimes think I can still “feel” my pet around me, even after he or she has passed on?

19) Can you communicate with an animal who’s far away?

20) How do you “find” the exact pet you want to talk to?

21) Can you communicate with animals who have passed on?

22) But how can someone with a physical body communicate with someone who no longer has a physical body?

23) Several times above you’ve mentioned “the mind’s eye?” What exactly is that?

24) Are you able to help a pet when other people like veterinarians and animal trainers haven’t been able to do so?

25) Should I only call you when my pet has a problem?

26) What happens when you’re doing a consultation by phone or e-mail?

27) Should I tell you anything specific before you talk with my pet?

1) What is an Animal Communicator?

An Animal Communicator is a person who’s able to carry on a “conversation” with an animal without using any spoken words. He or she then takes the picture information the animal “sends,” and “translates” it into sentences, so that it makes sense to the animal’s human companion.

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2) How does someone carry on a conversation with an animal?

Information is usually sent back and forth between the person and the animal through a series of pictures. I call this process “picture telepathy.” For me, it’s much like looking at snapshots in a photo album, or watching a videotape. These visual images convey various elements such as color, scent, sound, emotions, and expectations. (Some people, who are less visual, will simply “hear” this same information.) Using telepathy, animals are able to relate their wishes, needs, and feelings to us, and they’re also able to understand what we may want to say to them.

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3) Can you explain a little more about telepathy?

Telepathy is a form of communication which doesn’t require the use of any spoken words. It’s the primary way in which all animals communicate with each other, and it’s also how they try to communicate with humans. The ability to send and receive pictures isn’t a new form of communication for people either. In fact, it’s the oldest form of communication. Many of our ancestors used it before they began to rely on spoken languages. The Australian aborigine people still use telepathy as their preferred form of communication, even today, especially while doing their walkabouts. Many ordinary people also frequently communicate telepathically with each other, but often without realizing it. We no longer consciously use telepathy because we now tend to rely on the spoken word, but we’re all born with this ability, this intuitive gift. We just need to practice it. It’s simply a matter of “tuning in.”

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4) But how does a person “tune in?” And what do you do with what you see or hear?

You must first be motivated by love, and second, you need to set your own thoughts and judgments aside so that you can hear what another person or animal has to say. Meditation is a wonderful tool which can help you learn to quiet your mind so that you can listen without being interrupted by your own thoughts. When you’re listening with love, and your own thoughts and judgments are set aside, then you know the information you’re receiving is coming from the other person or animal. If you’re listening to an animal, the next step is to share the information you receive with someone who can act on it.

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5) If you can “read” animals, can you also “read” people?

Certainly. The process is the same whether you’re communicating telepathically with humans or with animals. Reading an animal is usually easier, however, because they’re always completely honest and able to express their feelings so openly. During the time I was developing my intuitive gift, I worked with both humans and animals, but now, I devote my time exclusively to helping the animals, and I leave the reading of people to other intuitives.

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6) How did you first know that you could communicate telepathically?

I was eight years old when I first realized that I was able to receive pictures from animals. While I was visiting a neighbor’s farm one day, a mother pig, who was feeding her piglets, started up a conversation with me. I thought everyone knew what the mother pig was saying, but I quickly discovered this was definitely not the case. When I talked about what I’d “heard,” my cousins laughed at me and told me I was weird. Their reactions made me want to stop being receptive, and after this experience, I tried to ignore what animals were saying. But often that was impossible, so I just learned to keep anything I was seeing and hearing to myself for a long time, until I was older and could better understand what to do with this kind of information.

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7) What kind of animals do you communicate with?

Even though I have a great affinity for dogs and cats, I can communicate with any animal, domesticated or wild. Usually the animals I translate for live in a home environment, though not always. Some examples of animals I’ve talked with, in addition to dogs and cats, are: horses, wolves, coyotes, rabbits, turtles, rats, guinea pigs, parrots, macaws, and love birds. Among the more exotic animals I’ve been able to help are: a wallaby, a pigmy goat, a potbellied pig and a Capuchin monkey.

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8) What do you do when you talk with an animal?

First, I create a quiet, serene atmosphere and I usually sit, with my eyes closed, to minimize all possible distractions. When I connect with the animal and sense that he (or she) is ready to talk with me, I first give him an opportunity to say anything he wants. After that, I begin to ask him the questions his “parents” want to have answered. Because I’m using picture telepathy, I’ll begin to see, in my mind’s eye whatever images the animal sends me. The pictures are full of sensory information that comes to me in the form of sights, smells, hearing, textures, and tastes. Not only do I see an image, but I also receive feelings about what an animal is telling me.

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9) What do animals want to talk about?

They talk about what’s important to them, and this covers a very wide variety of topics, among them: why certain changes have been made in their routines; how something they’re eating is not agreeing with them; how much they like their treats or their walks; how and why they’re trying to help the people they live with; how they’re bored and need a job to do every day; what experiences they’ve had in a previous home; how they get along with other pets in the family; how they were injured; how we can help them heal from an injury; and, how much they want us to let them go peacefully at the end of their lives. This list covers only a few of the things they want to talk about. You can read about many more of them in my books “What Animals Tell Me” and “Pets Have Feelings Too.”

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10) What are some of the more common problems you discuss with cats and dogs?

Probably the most common problem people ask me to discuss with their cats is why they’re missing the litter box, or why they’re doing their business on the carpet or on the bed, or even right in front of their special person. There’s always a good reason, and once we discover what it is, the problem can be corrected. With dogs, people usually want me to find out why they misbehave, or why they’re so stressed out when no one is home during a long workday or when the family goes on vacation. When they’re left alone, many dogs fear their humans have abandoned them, or they wonder when, or if, their special people will ever be coming back. I work to resolve their sense of separation anxiety and help them overcome destructive behaviors when they have to be alone for many hours.

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11) Can you help pets with other kinds of behavioral problems, especially if the pets have been abused?

Many pets with different types of behavioral problems can be helped, once I’m able to discover the reasons for those problems. And people who have adopted older pets often want to know whether or not they were abused in their previous homes. These people want to try to understand their new pet’s unique or troublesome behaviors, which may be the result of previous abuse. I can usually tell them what their pets’ lives were like before they came to live in their present homes, if the pets have not been too traumatized, and if they’re willing to share their previous experiences with me. We can then use that information to help those pets satisfactorily adjust to their new environment.

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12) Can you convince an animal to stop a certain behavior?

Not always, because all animals have free will, and in some cases, we’re asking them to stop doing something that’s prompted by their natural instincts. But I can explain the rules of the house to them, and I can also explain their feelings about those rules to their “parents.” Sometimes our rules are very difficult for an animal to observe, but I try to help both people and pets reach a compromise that works well for everyone. Once human and pet both understand each other, many apparent behavioral problems can be resolved quickly and easily.

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13) What can you do to help pets who are sick?

When pets are ill, especially with something that’s difficult to diagnose, sometimes they may be able to help identify the cause of the problem so that it can then be properly treated. Or they may want to talk about how they’re reacting unfavorably to a certain medication. At the very least, sick pets can often tell me what they’d like their humans to do to make things better or more comfortable for them.

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14) Can animals tell you about the pain they feel, or how they got hurt?

Absolutely! They can often tell me exactly where the pain is located and, then in my own body, I can feel how intense their pain actually is. Some animals can even identify what’s causing their problem, and tell me what needs to be done to fix it. Imagine how helpful this kind of information is for a veterinarian, or a chiropractor who works with pets! In several cases, animals have even been able to clearly provide details about the way in which they were accidentally injured. The information those animals shared with me helped to explain, or to confirm, the very injuries which doctors and chiropractors saw on x-rays, or found during an examination. This was particularly helpful when no one else had witnessed the accident. Translating for sick or injured animals is one of the most beneficial and rewarding activities of my work as an animal communicator.

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15) How are you able to acquire this information from an animal?

Often, pets simply tell me directly what’s wrong, but when they don’t or when they can’t, there’s another method I use. One of the most important things I experience are physical sensations in my body which can tell me what’s going on in the pet’s body. Before I talk with a pet, I first check to see what I’m feeling in every part of my body so I’ll be able to clearly tell the difference between what I’m feeling and what’s affecting the animal. If a pet has health issues, I scan the pet’s body from head to tail, and mentally check each of the internal organs as I go. If there’s a problem area, I’ll see, in my mind’s eye, something like a pinpoint laser beam of red light on that organ, or I may even see a large glowing area of light if the problem is more serious.

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16) Do you work with pets who are dying?

This is a very important part of my work. If a pet is dying, I can find out what his or her end-of-life wishes are and then help the pet’s human find ways to best honor those wishes.

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17) Do animals know when they’re dying, or why we sometimes need to put them down?

I receive many calls from people when their pets are obviously dying or living in great pain and misery. It’s always very sad to have to tell a person that it’s time to let their pet go, especially when the person still hopes there’s a chance for recovery, or simply isn’t ready to say goodbye yet. But animals usually know when their time has come, and unlike most humans, they readily accept that fact. Often, they even ask us to help them make their transitions. The best thing a human can do is to give the animal an opportunity to express his or her wishes, and let them participate in choosing the time to leave. And knowing the pet’s wishes often makes it easier for a person to take that last loving step to relieve them of their pain and suffering.

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18) Why do I sometimes think I can still “feel” my pet around me, even after he or she has passed on?

The spirit of a pet may often be around you for awhile after they leave, especially when they’re trying to console you, or bring you some closure, or help you in a variety of other ways. They themselves may choose to be close to you at certain times, or you may feel their “presence” when you reach out and ask them to be close to you, remembering the deep love you shared with each other.

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19) Can you communicate with an animal who’s far away?

Yes. Being physically present when communicating with an animal isn’t essential. Telepathy is a communication from mind to mind, and when you’re exchanging thoughts, distance isn’t relevant. Though it’s not an apples-to-apples comparison, it might be a little easier to comprehend if you think about how easily our voices can now travel over long distances using wireless communication. For voice communication, we use phones which send signals. For telepathic communication we use our minds which send thoughts.

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20) How do you “find” the exact pet you want to talk to?

I’ve communicated with animals, not only in the United States, but all over the world, in far away places like Japan, Korea, Israel, Germany, the Bahamas, England, Spain, Brazil and Argentina. That’s because each pet has his or her own personal “frequency” or wave length which I can connect with. It’s a little like tuning in to a specific station on a radio or TV. Though I’ve been able to locate pets with only minimal information, it’s usually easier and faster for me to “find” individual pets if you’ll first tell me your pet’s name, age, sex, breed, and location, or send me a picture. That way, I know exactly who I’m looking for.

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21) Can you communicate with animals who have passed on?

Yes. Just as it’s possible to communicate with people who have made their transitions from human experience into spiritual experience, it’s also possible to communicate with animals who have made their transitions. However, before I try to communicate with them, it’s usually best to wait awhile after animals leave, so that they have an opportunity to become better readjusted to their life in spirit first. Once they’ve “settled in” though, they’re usually quick and eager to respond whenever I ask to talk with them.

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22) But how can someone with a physical body communicate with someone who no longer has a physical body?

Because we have bodies, and we usually communicate by speaking out loud, we tend to believe that we’re communicating body to body with each other. But this isn’t so. Every thought we ever receive or send out is a form of energy. In essence, our thoughts are a consciousness to consciousness communication, or a spiritual communication. Consequently, a person or an animal doesn’t require a physical body to be able to convey their love or their messages.

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23) Several times above you’ve mentioned “the mind’s eye?” What exactly is that?

It’s the intuitive part of each of us which is sometimes called the third eye. When we’re not using any spoken words, it’s where we’re able to perceive the thoughts exchanged between two people, or between a person and an animal. When a person is using the mind’s eye, usually with their physical eyes closed, he or she may “feel” a sense of energy in a place on the forehead between the eyebrows.

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24) Are you able to help a pet when other people like veterinarians and animal trainers haven’t been able to do so?

People often come to me as a last resort. I’m like the detective who finds the missing piece of the puzzle by going straight to the source — the animals themselves. Often, they’re the only ones who can explain where they hurt, or why they were injured, or what’s making them sick, or why they’re behaving as they do. The information they provide should then always be shared with the pet’s veterinarian, chiropractor, acupuncturist, or animal behaviorist.

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25) Should I only call you when my pet has a problem?

As you’ve seen, there are many things pets want to talk about, but those topics don’t always involve a problem. Sometimes, it’s a good idea to simply “check in” with your pets occasionally to see how they feel their lives are going, and maybe to discover something you can do to make their lives happier or more comfortable. Even though you’re not expecting it, you may find out something unusual during an otherwise routine visit.

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26) What happens when you’re doing a consultation by phone or e-mail?

If we can’t all be together at the same time, I may talk to your pet early in the morning asking the questions you gave me in advance, and writing notes about the pet’s answers. Later on, at a time we’ve scheduled, I’ll review the entire conversation with you when we talk by phone, or I’ll send you my notes via e-mail.

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27) Should I tell you anything specific before you talk with my pet?

The only things I want to know about pets ahead of time are: their name, age, sex, breed, and location, and any questions you want me to ask. Though it’s not absolutely essential, it’s also helpful for me to see the pet’s picture if I’m going to be doing a phone or e-mail consultation. Your questions shouldn’t reveal any specific details about a behavioral problem or health challenge. This way, both you and I can be certain that any information I receive is truly coming from your pet. I don’t want to know details ahead of time because I want our communication to be clear, and free from any pre-determined thoughts. After I tell you what your pet has told me, then I very much enjoy learning about anything specific you want to share with me which confirms what your pet has talked about.

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